Can You Get High off Suboxone

As an opiate drug, Suboxone does have the potential to cause a sense of euphoria and pleasure when used. This positive effect on emotion is often termed a “high.” Nemours notes that most drug users abuse drugs so they can experience a “high.” Suboxone’s ability to provide a “high” is one of the most common reasons the drug is misused.


Symptoms of a High

Suboxone should only provide the patient with mild alterations in mood. Most addicts taking Suboxone report only a moderate pleasurable response; however, when taken inappropriately, the drug can deliver a high. Recognizing an opiate high may help diagnose an addiction to Suboxone.

Signs of a high include:
  • A drastic change in mood. While on a high, patients will exhibit a sudden change in mood. In the case of a Suboxone high, patients will generally exceedingly happy.
  • Confusion. The effects of high doses of Suboxone on the brain often inhibit critical and rational thought. A person on a high will have difficulty holding a logical conversation and may be confused when forced to focus.
  • Lethargy. When high, Suboxone abusers tend to be lethargic. They will lounge or relax and may be unwilling to perform any other activity. They will want to be left alone to experience the positive emotions elicited by the drug.

If a patient is exhibiting these signs, there is a high probability that they are abusing Suboxone and may be addicted to the drug. Prompt medical treatment is the best way to curtail the drug abuse and prevent any future addiction-related health problems.


The pleasurable experience associated with Suboxone is derived from its opiate content, in the form of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine attaches to receptors in the brain and stimulates the pleasure center. Higher levels of the drug lead to more stimulation.

How Does Suboxone Make You High?

Suboxone is typically given in small to medium doses so the patient does not experience an extreme high but rather a mild euphoria that helps ameliorate the craving for stronger drugs.

However, if you take large doses of buprenorphine, you greatly increase the high the drug gives and are at risk of becoming addicted.


getting high on suboxoneThen Why Use the Drug?

Suboxone, despite its ability to cause addiction, is still a viable treatment medication for patients suffering from opiate dependency. When going through detoxification and the succeeding steps of drug rehabilitation, opiate users experience physical and psychological cravings for their drug of choice. Using Suboxone helps satisfy some of these cravings by providing a small amount of buprenorphine.

Buprenorphine, even though it is an opioid, is relatively weaker than other drugs, like heroin. Even when taken in high doses, buprenorphine does not produce the same effect as other illicit drugs. Therefore, Suboxone is less likely to be abused but still helps treat a patient suffering from opiate withdrawal.

Without some form of opiate medication, most patients addicted to heroin or other opioid drugs will suffer a great deal while going through withdrawal. The worst-case scenario is that the pain and cravings will drive the addict back to drug abuse.

As an opiate drug, Suboxone does have the potential to cause a sense of euphoria and pleasure when used. This positive effect on emotion is often termed a “high.” Nemours notes that most drug users abuse drugs so they can experience a “high.” Suboxone’s ability to provide a “high” is one of the most common reasons the drug is misused.